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Missouri River Basin

U.S. Drought Monitor - Missouri River Basin DEWS

U.S. Drought Monitor - Missouri River Basin DEWS
U.S. Drought Monitor - Missouri River Basin DEWS
Drought Conditions (Percent Area)
WeekNoneD0-D4D1-D4D2-D4D3-D4D4
Current
3/21/2017
61.18%38.82%20.17%1.81%0.00%0.00%
Last Week
3/14/2017
64.57%35.43%18.58%1.63%0.00%0.00%
Three Months Ago
12/20/2016
53.38%46.62%15.80%2.32%0.00%0.00%
Start of Calendar Year
1/03/2017
55.38%44.62%16.00%1.41%0.00%0.00%
One Year Ago
3/22/2016
67.32%32.68%5.95%1.28%0.00%0.00%

Drought Intensities

  •       None: No Drought
  •       D0: Abnormally Dry
  •       D1: Moderate Drought
  •       D2: Severe Drought
  •       D3: Extreme Drought
  •       D4: Exceptional Drought
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Download the following pie chart as an Image
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Pie chart describing current drought for this location.
Download the following pie chart as an Image
Showing Data will replace the pie chart below with a data table.
Pie chart describing current drought for this location.

Conditions for the week of March 15-21

There were no changes to the drought depiction in the Northern Plains, with light showers (less than 0.5 inch) offering no substantial relief to the Long-term Moderate Drought (D1). Across southern Nebraska and much of Kansas, 7-day average temperatures as much as 7°F above normal coupled with increasingly dry conditions noted out to 60 days (locally less than 25 percent of normal, deficits of 1 to 3 inches) led to widespread expansion of Abnormal Dryness (D0).  In eastern Kansas, 90-day precipitation less than 50 percent of normal (locally less than 30 percent) continued to deplete soil moisture, resulting in the expansion of Moderate Drought (D1).  In Colorado, unseasonable warmth (7-day average temperatures as much as 18°F above normal) and protracted dryness (6-month precipitation averaging 30 to 50 percent of normal) led to the expansion of Severe Drought (D2) in north-central portions of the state. Rain will be needed soon everywhere east of the Rockies to prevent a rapid intensification of drought, as winter wheat continues to break dormancy and soil moisture requirements increase.

Read more about the Missouri River Basin DEWS