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Event Date
May 11, 2022

Drought in Oklahoma began in fall 2021 and has expanded and worsened during early 2022. The U.S. Drought Monitor shows over one-third (36%) of the state in Extreme (D3) Drought and nearly a tenth (9.4%) in Exceptional (D4) Drought. During this webinar, Gary McManus, the Oklahoma State Climatologist, and Victor Murphy, from the National Weather Service, talked about current drought conditions, the long-range forecast, and the impact recent precipitation had on drought conditions across the state.

Event Date
May 10, 2022

The Southeast region experienced near-average temperatures in the last 30 days. Precipitation, in general, was variable and below average for most of the region. This dryness has contributed to the gradual intensification of drought conditions in some parts of the region, including the eastern Carolinas and southern Florida. Streamflows are near normal across most of the Southeast with the exception being coastal North Carolina and southern Virginia, where they are below normal.

Event Date
May 5, 2022

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NOAA’s National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) are holding a series of listening sessions on Drought Prediction and Water Availability to seek input on priorities and needs related to predicting water availability changes under drought conditions at national and regional scales.

Event Date
April 27, 2022

Drought in Texas has expanded and worsened during early 2022. The US Drought monitor shows 53.5% of the state in Extreme (D3) or Exceptional (D4) drought, the highest percentage since February of 2012. In this webinar John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas State Climatologist, and Victor Murphy, with the National Weather Service, talked about current drought conditions, the long-range forecast, and the impact recent precipitation had on drought conditions across the state.

Event Date
April 25, 2022

According to the April 19, 2022 U.S. Drought Monitor, 70.2% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought, with 22.4% of the region in Extreme/Exceptional Drought (D3/D4). While water availability in some areas of Washington and Idaho has improved over the winter months, much of southern and eastern Oregon and portions of Idaho recorded their driest 3-month January-March on record.

Event Date
April 12, 2022

The Southeast region experienced near-average temperatures the last 30 days with recent spring temperature swings. Although precipitation has been hit or miss due to the springtime thunderstorms, streamflows are mostly near-to-above normal across the region. Drought conditions persist in the eastern Carolinas and southern Georgia. Anticipated rain over the next week will help improve this precipitation deficit, but this still needs to be monitored carefully as the region continues through the spring and water demand increases.

Event Date
April 5, 2022

The Southwest has experienced an on-again, off-again winter snow pattern. As we prepare for the spring snowmelt, moderate (D1) to exceptional (D4) drought persists across the region. This drought briefing focused on winter drought conditions and forecasts for spring for Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah. It also took a closer look at April 1 snowpack conditions along with a deeper dive into snow data and how this year's snowpack will translate into runoff and streamflow through spring.

Event Date
March 29, 2022

The National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) and the National Weather Service (NWS) hosted two webinars on soil moisture data and applications. These webinars are intended to help NWS operational forecasters and other weather & climate service providers better understand soil moisture monitoring and its practical applications.

Event Date
March 28, 2022

 

According to the March 22 U.S. Drought Monitor, 100% of California/Nevada is in drought, with 36.8% in extreme (D3) or exceptional (D4) drought. Most of the western U.S. was exceptionally dry in February, with record low total precipitation at over 200 SNOTEL sites. In California, the driest January and February in state history has led to a March 1 statewide snowpack of less than 70% of average, down from 160% at the start of the new year. With low reservoir carryover, the impacts of snow drought will reach into summer and beyond.

Event Date
March 8, 2022

The Southeast region experienced a winter that could not make up its mind! December was dry and warm, January was cooler with more precipitation, and February leaned to drier and warmer conditions. The recent dryness is concerning because, for much of the region, this is the time of the year when river flooding peaks (except for the Florida peninsula) and water recharge takes place. However, streamflows are mostly below normal, especially across the Carolinas and in some parts of Alabama, Georgia, and Florida.